Install Google Chrome on Fedora 30/29, CentOS/RHEL 7.7 - Comment Page: 1

This guide explains howto install Google Chrome Web browser on Fedora 30/29/28/27 and CentOS/Red Hat (RHEL) 7.7. Best way to install and keep up-to-date with Google Chrome browser is use Google's own YUM/DNF repository. Install Google Chrome on Fedora 30/29/28, CentOS 7.7, Red Hat (RHEL) 7.7 [inttf_post_ad1] 1. Change to root user. sudo -i ## OR ## su - 2. Enable Google YUM repository Note: Google Chrome Linux version doesn't get any 32-bit (x86) updates and 32-bit repo is also removed. If you have 32-bit version installed, then you can use it, but you can't get security updates or other updates anymore. Fedora 30/29/28 dnf install...

360 comments on “Install Google Chrome on Fedora 30/29, CentOS/RHEL 7.7 - Comment Page: 1

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    1. […] View original post here: Howto Install Google Chrome Web Browser with YUM on Fedora, CentOS … […]

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    2. Why do all this? Just install the package from google.com/chrome and it will automatically add the repo.

      Reply
      • Hi Rohan Dhruva,

        Thank you for your comment.

        First of all, the answer to your why question?
        Some users are accustomed to use the command line and want to install the repositories and packages using the command line. And this manual method is very simple in my opinion, even simpler, than the “terms of use” approval on Google’s website, downloading RPM and installing it manually. But this is of course just my opinion.

        Thank you, however, a good tip. Personally, I did not even know that Google Chrome RPM package install will also install Google YUM repository.

        Btw. I could not find the Google Google Chrome Unstable version from download page, just only Google Chrome Beta version?

        Reply
      • how to install google chrome in 32 bit linux(fedora 16)

        google-chrome-stable-16.0.912.77-118311.i386 requires libcurl.so.4
        google-chrome-stable-16.0.912.77-118311.i386 requires libgconf-2.so.4
        google-chrome-stable-16.0.912.77-118311.i386 requires libXss.so.1
        google-chrome-stable-16.0.912.77-118311.i386 requires lsb >= 4.0
        google-chrome-stable-16.0.912.77-118311.i386 requires libnss3.so(NSS_3.12.3)
        google-chrome-stable-16.0.912.77-118311.i386 requires libbz2.so.1

        above error occurs while installing the google chrome

        Reply
        • Hi monica,

          Could you post full/real error message, because I can’t see any error message? Only libraries what Google Chrome requires.

          Reply
    3. Thanks for the post, enjoyed it.

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    4. Error: Missing Dependency: lsb >= 3.2 is needed by package google-chrome-beta
      Error: Missing Dependency: xdg-utils is needed by package google-chrome-beta

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      • Hi Dave,

        Thank you for your correction, you’re absolutely right that, currently, Google Chrome can not be installed on CentOS 5.4 distribution.

        My apologies to you Dave and all other readers who have mistakenly imagined, that Google Chrome could install on the CentOS 5.4 distribution.

        I removed all references, to the CentOS (not only title part), because my purpose is help others here and certainly not share wrong information here. :)

        But it is good to note that Red Hat (RHEL) 6 is newer and has newer packages, so this guide works brilliantly with new Red Hat 6. As well as this “Test Driving Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6” writing shows.

        It therefore appears that the original Google’s Google Chrome can be installed on the next CentOS (CentOS 6).

        Reply
        • yes, i just ran these instructions on CentOS 6.2 and it worked perfectly.

          Reply
    5. […] More: Install Google Chrome with YUM on Fedora, Red Hat (RHEL) | if not … […]

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    6. This works a treat on Fedora 13 i386 and x86_64. I for one agree with JR. I prefer to install programs from the command line. For one its much faster, two I can see everything that is going on and what is being installed, 3rdly you don’t have to put your root password in 2 or 3 different times when installing from the CLI. Unlike installing an RPM. Its almost as bad as UAC’s on Windows Vista and 7

      Reply
    7. […] check following tipsFree up space Trick preupgrade into downloading the installerWhat to do next?Install Google Chrome Beta or Google Chrome Unstable on Fedora 13Install Adobe Flash Player 10 on Fedora 13Install Sun Java (JDK, JRE) on Fedora 13Install Adobe AIR […]

      Reply
    8. […] – Set NTP servers27. Send hardware profile28. Login Fedora29. Fedora desktopWhat to do next?Install Google Chrome Beta or Google Chrome Unstable on Fedora 13Install Adobe Flash Player 10 on Fedora 13Install Sun Java (JDK, JRE) on Fedora 13Install Adobe AIR […]

      Reply
    9. You can have both the 32-bit and 64-bit repo info in one file and move the google.repo file to any fedora system to make management easier. Also one may prefer to install the google-chrome-stable version instead of a beta or unstable version.

      Reply
      • Hi Jeff,

        Thanks for the tip. It’s true that the Google Chrome 32-bit and 64-bit repos can be combined in one file. And this certainly facilitates the google.repo file transfer system to another.

        I added Google Chrome Stable version installation in this guide.

        Reply
    10. […] differences between Chromium and Google Chrome can be found here.Earlier I write guide, howto install Google Chrome (Stable, Beta or Unstable) on Fedora using YUM. And this is guide, howto Install Chromium on Fedora using YUM.Install Chromium with YUM on […]

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    11. Hey, thank you for this helpful blog post. I was trying to clean up my yum repositories because of a problem somewhere in there. Of course, that involved removing the old .repo files, one of which was Google’s update repository. I was looking for what to put in the file so I could be sure Chrome stays patched. Your blog was the first to give me what I needed, so thanks again.

      People like Rohan Dhruva are ridiculously ignorant if they cannot see the immense benefit of this kind of blog post. Some Linux users wonder what we have to fear from n00bs picking up on the OS, and quite frankly this is a perfect manifestation of the overall lack of interest in knowledge some people bring to the table. As much as people like Rohan would like it to do so, THE GUI DOES NOT FIX EVERYTHING BY MAGIC. Believe it or not, Linux is heavily dependent on underlying config files, and, yes, sometimes hands have to get dirty!

      The official Google Chrome download page will be very easy to find for those who are looking for it (especially using a Google search for “google chrome,” which is what every single person with more than one brain cell will be doing if they want to know how to install Chrome but can’t figure it out). While the point-and-click method WILL add the repository automatically, it is sometimes necessary or desirable to use the methods presented in this post. Either way, the author is providing information to the community that could very well be of help to someone (it was to me), yet you are complaining?

      Rohan, people like you will be the downfall of the open-source community. On the other hand, JR, thanks for your time.

      Reply
      • Oh, and by the way, if anyone is getting Errno 14s, “Cannot retrieve repository metadata…,” pycurl errors, etc. on certain repositories seemingly no matter what they do, it might indicate a DNS resolution problem. Try pinging the server in question, find out the IP address, and add it to your /etc/hosts file. It fixed some things for me.

        Reply
    12. Great Post . It helped me a lot for installing chrome thanks

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    13. These instructions assume a certain ability. I don’t know how to add this to the etc file. Where can I find more basic step by step instructions? My default package installer isn’t playing along so I cant install Skype, Picasa Chrome and the like.

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      • Hi Sean,

        Yes you are right these instructions assume a certain ability.

        This is more step-by-step, howto create that file…try following:
        1. Open command line
        2. Change root user (check this guide)
        3. Open /etc/yum.repos.d/google.repo file on your favourite editor (example gedit)

        
        gedit /etc/yum.repos.d/google.repo
        

        4. Paste content
        5. Save

        Now you have Google-Chrome repository added and you can use (example) package installer to install Google-Chrome.

        Reply
    14. I’m sorry but I’m newbie in using this…

      what other editor can I use other that gedit? I typed the command to create a .repo file and it doesnt work for some reason. Command blah, blah….

      PLease help..

      Reply
      • Hi Joemar,

        You can use any text editor such as vi, vim, nano, pico, joe, kate, kwrite and so on.

        I guess that the another text-editor is not enough to solve your problem. So maybe you could clarify a little, what is problem with Google repository? And what error messages you get?

        Reply
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