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MySQL is a relational database management system (RDBMS) that runs as a server providing multi-user access to a number of databases. This is guide, howto install or upgrade MySQL Community Server latest version 5.7 (5.7.19)/8.0 (8.0.2) on Fedora 26/25/24, CentOS 7.3/6.9 and Red Hat (RHEL) 7.3/6.9. This guide works of course with Oracle Linux and Scientific Linux too and MySQL 8.0/5.6 installation is possible too.

Note: If you are upgrading MySQL (from earlier version), then make sure that you backup (dump and copy) your database and configs. And remember run mysql_upgrade command.

Install MySQL Database 5.7.19/8.0.2 on Fedora 26/25/24, CentOS 7.3/6.9, Red Hat (RHEL) 7.3/6.9

1. Change root user


su -
## OR ##
sudo -i

2. Install MySQL YUM repository

Fedora


## Fedora 26 ##
dnf install https://dev.mysql.com/get/mysql57-community-release-fc26-10.noarch.rpm

## Fedora 25 ##
dnf install https://dev.mysql.com/get/mysql57-community-release-fc25-10.noarch.rpm

## Fedora 24 ##
dnf install https://dev.mysql.com/get/mysql57-community-release-fc24-10.noarch.rpm

CentOS and Red Hat (RHEL)


## CentOS 7 and Red Hat (RHEL) 7 ##
yum localinstall https://dev.mysql.com/get/mysql57-community-release-el7-11.noarch.rpm

## CentOS 6 and Red Hat (RHEL) 6 ##
yum localinstall https://dev.mysql.com/get/mysql57-community-release-el6-11.noarch.rpm

3a. Update or Install MySQL 5.7.19

Fedora 26/25/24


dnf install mysql-community-server

CentOS 7.3/6.9 and Red Hat (RHEL) 7.3/6.9


yum install mysql-community-server

3b. Update or Install MySQL 8.0.2

Fedora 26/25/24


dnf --enablerepo=mysql80-community install mysql-community-server

CentOS 7.3/6.9 and Red Hat (RHEL) 7.3/6.9


yum --enablerepo=mysql80-community install mysql-community-server

4. Start MySQL server and autostart MySQL on boot

Fedora 26/25/24 and CentOS 7.3 and Red Hat (RHEL) 7.3


systemctl start mysqld.service ## use restart after update

systemctl enable mysqld.service

CentOS 6.9 and Red Hat (RHEL) 6.9


/etc/init.d/mysql start ## use restart after update
## OR ##
service mysql start ## use restart after update

chkconfig --levels 235 mysqld on

5. Get Your Generated Random root Password


grep 'A temporary password is generated for root@localhost' /var/log/mysqld.log |tail -1

Example Output:


2015-11-20T21:11:44.229891Z 1 [Note] A temporary password is generated for root@localhost: -et)QoL4MLid

And root password is: -et)QoL4MLid

6. MySQL Secure Installation

  • Change root password
  • Remove anonymous users
  • Disallow root login remotely
  • Remove test database and access to it
  • Reload privilege tables

Start MySQL Secure Installation with following command


/usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation

Output:



Securing the MySQL server deployment.

Enter password for user root: 

The existing password for the user account root has expired. Please set a new password.

New password: 

Re-enter new password: 

VALIDATE PASSWORD PLUGIN can be used to test passwords
and improve security. It checks the strength of password
and allows the users to set only those passwords which are
secure enough. Would you like to setup VALIDATE PASSWORD plugin?

Press y|Y for Yes, any other key for No: y

There are three levels of password validation policy:

LOW    Length >= 8
MEDIUM Length >= 8, numeric, mixed case, and special characters
STRONG Length >= 8, numeric, mixed case, special characters and dictionary                  file

Please enter 0 = LOW, 1 = MEDIUM and 2 = STRONG: 0
Using existing password for root.

Estimated strength of the password: 100 
Change the password for root ? ((Press y|Y for Yes, any other key for No) : y

New password: 

Re-enter new password: 

Estimated strength of the password: 50 
Do you wish to continue with the password provided?(Press y|Y for Yes, any other key for No) : y
By default, a MySQL installation has an anonymous user,
allowing anyone to log into MySQL without having to have
a user account created for them. This is intended only for
testing, and to make the installation go a bit smoother.
You should remove them before moving into a production
environment.

Remove anonymous users? (Press y|Y for Yes, any other key for No) : y
Success.


Normally, root should only be allowed to connect from
'localhost'. This ensures that someone cannot guess at
the root password from the network.

Disallow root login remotely? (Press y|Y for Yes, any other key for No) : y
Success.

By default, MySQL comes with a database named 'test' that
anyone can access. This is also intended only for testing,
and should be removed before moving into a production
environment.


Remove test database and access to it? (Press y|Y for Yes, any other key for No) : y
 - Dropping test database...
Success.

 - Removing privileges on test database...
Success.

Reloading the privilege tables will ensure that all changes
made so far will take effect immediately.

Reload privilege tables now? (Press y|Y for Yes, any other key for No) : y
Success.

All done! 

Note: If you don’t want some reason, do a “MySQL Secure Installation” then at least it’s very important to change the root user’s password


mysqladmin -u root password [your_password_here]

## Example ##
mysqladmin -u root password myownsecrectpass

7. Connect to MySQL database (localhost) with password


mysql -u root -p

## OR ##
mysql -h localhost -u root -p

8. Create Database, Create MySQL User and Enable Remote Connections to MySQL Database

This example uses following parameters:

  • DB_NAME = webdb
  • USER_NAME = webdb_user
  • REMOTE_IP = 10.0.15.25
  • PASSWORD = password123
  • PERMISSIONS = ALL

## CREATE DATABASE ##
mysql> CREATE DATABASE webdb;

## CREATE USER ##
mysql> CREATE USER 'webdb_user'@'10.0.15.25' IDENTIFIED BY 'password123';

## GRANT PERMISSIONS ##
mysql> GRANT ALL ON webdb.* TO 'webdb_user'@'10.0.15.25';

##  FLUSH PRIVILEGES, Tell the server to reload the grant tables  ##
mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Enable Remote Connection to MariaDB Server –> Open MySQL Port (3306) on Iptables Firewall (as root user again)

1. Fedora 26/25/24 and CentOS/Red Hat (RHEL) 7.3

1.1 Add New Rule to Firewalld


firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=mysql

## OR ##

firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add --port=3306/tcp

1.2 Restart firewalld.service


systemctl restart firewalld.service

2. CentOS/Red Hat (RHEL) 6.9

2.1 Edit /etc/sysconfig/iptables file:

nano -w /etc/sysconfig/iptables

2.2 Add following INPUT rule:

-A INPUT -m state --state NEW -m tcp -p tcp --dport 3306 -j ACCEPT

2.3 Restart Iptables Firewall:


service iptables restart
## OR ##
/etc/init.d/iptables restart

3. Test remote connection


mysql -h 10.0.15.25 -u myusername -p